Québec: Escalade Parc Régional du Poisson Blanc Guidebook by Socrate Badeau

Buy Poisson Blanc

Voici un guide complet de l’escalade qu’on trouve dans le Parc régional du Poisson Blanc. Il y a longtemps que la grimpe se pratique sur le territoire, mais en 2016, suite à la demande des gestionnaires du Parc, ceux-ci ont établi une collaboration avec la FQME et à l’aide de plusieurs bénévoles ont procédé au développement de l’escalade sur les falaises du réservoir. Le résultat est ce qui se retrouve dans ce guide: cinq secteurs avec plus de 130 voies.

L’approche à l’escalade se fait uniquement par bateau et peut nécessiter jusqu’à 4 heures en canot pour se rendre. Il est donc commun de faire du canot-camping sur les îles aux sites désignés. Pour toute réservation ou information pour le camping vous devez vous référer au site du Poisson Blanc:  www.poissonblanc.ca

Il est essentiel de respecter la réglementation en vigueur dans le Parc. Y avoir accès et y grimper est un privilège, aidez-nous à conserver l’accès à ce site unique.

Bonne aventure!

Here is the complet guide to rock-climbing in the Parc Régional du Poison Blanc. Climbing on the various cliffs in the parc has been occasionally practiced by adventurous enthusiasts.  But, in 2016 development stepped up. The Parc administrators collaborated with the FQME to organise and structure the development on the cliffs of the Parc.  So, with the help of many volunteers there a been a huge boost to the number of climbs and cliffs accessible to climbing.  The result is that there are now over 5 areas with over 130climbs.  

Approaching the climbs can only be done by boat.  A canoe approach can be up to 4 hours.  It is therefore common practice for climbers to camp on one of the many islands at the designated camping spots.  For all information on access to the Parc and camping reservations please consult the parc’s webpage at:  www.poissonblanc.ca

Climbing in the parc is a unique experience, and it is a privilege to have access to such a magnificent and natural place.  Therefore, please respect all parc policies concerning reservations and access.

Have a great adventure!

Québec: Escalade Sainte-Émélie (Proximus et Sérénité) by Socrate Badeau

Buy Escalade Sainte-Émélie (Proximus et Sérénité) here and save money versus purchasing from within our app via Apple or Google. It’s exactly the same guidebook, but offered at a lower price on rakkup.com.

 

The Parc de la Matawinie is a beautiful wildness area with great hiking trails, lakes and superb views. Sainte Émélie-de l’Énergie is the gateway to this beautiful playground. If climbing is your fix, you are in luck. There are lots of undeveloped areas if you’re ready for a little bushwhacking. But if you want ready to climb routes well then you won’t be held lacking.

Proximus is the typical roadside crag with little to no approach. Just park and walk for less than one min and choose your climb. Most climbs here are bolt protected sport climbs, but you’ll find a few easier trad lines if that’s more to your taste. The angle varies from polished slabs to overhanging faces and arêtes. The climbs are quite technical and thought provoking. It’s just a great place to try hard.

Sérénité is simply unique. The climbing here is great. It’s definitively one of my favourite cliffs in the Montreal area. Two distinctly different climbing styles will greet you here. First off is 25m of overhanging face with lots of features. Pump and technique is the challenge here. Climbs will have you redlining for the anchors. The second style is more of a face-slab style. But unlike most featureless friction slabs, you’ll be greeted to a variety of slopey step-like holds. Creative positioning and mantling will get you through some cruxes but good footwork and balance are the key. And if that’s not enough, bring your fishing rod and walk up to the lake to try and catch you lake trout that only the patient will catch.

Have fun and enjoy.

Learn more about Socrate Badeau.

Rumney Rock Climbing – by Ward Smith

Buy Rumney here and save money versus purchasing from within our app via Apple or Google. It’s exactly the same guidebook, but offered at a lower price on rakkup.com.

James Otey on Tsunami 5.12c/d

James Otey on Tsunami 5.12c/d

Rumney is the premier sport climbing venue in the Northeast. Located at the southwestern corner of the White Mountain National Forest in New Hampshire, the crags are scattered across the south-facing slopes of Rattlesnake Mountain. With a wide selection of all-bolted routes from 5.2 to 5.15, there are challenges for climbers of any ability.

Chloe Leberge on Yer Anus 5.9

Chloe Leberge on Yer Anus 5.9

But it is more than the bolts that make Rumney so special. Each of the cliffs has a distinctive feel, making it seem like many different areas in one. The predominant rock type –schist – demands a skillfull blend of power and technique. A scenic setting above the Baker River, a great swimming hole, and stable access all contribute to the area’s popularity.

This is the fifth guidebook to Rumney, and the area has undergone incredible changes over that time. Gone are the days of having the crags to yourself –and of free parking. The Forest Service has used the fees to upgrade the parking lots, construct toilet facilities, and improve trails accessing the cliffs. By paying the parking fee and obeying all closures, climbers can demonstrate that we are a responsible user group, and ensure future access for all of us.

Kevin Ogden on Whip Tide 5.12b.

Kevin Ogden on Whip Tide 5.12b.

Climbers have helped to make Rumney what it is today. In 1993, access to the crags was posted by a private landowner. The Access Fund and the Rumney Climber’s Association (RCA) bought the land, and then sold it to the Forest Service. Most recently, the RCA has purchased the last privately owned area of cliffs – the Northwest Crags – through their “final frontier” initiative. A new parking lot has been constructed at the Buffalo Pit, and a new trail was built in order to provide additional access to the Northwest Crags. Please consider joining both the Access Fund and the Rumney Climber’s Association in order to help preserve the crags that we love so much.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Learn more about Ward Smith here.

Bouldering Moore’s Wall – by Adam Sokolow

Buy Bouldering Moore’s Wall here and save money versus purchasing from within our app via Apple or Google. It’s exactly the same guidebook, but offered at a lower price on rakkup.com.

Moore's Wall

Moore’s Wall

The quality of climbing at Moore’s Wall is superb. As John Sherman said in his Stone Crusade, the rock is “bullet-hard quartzite”. Large blocky features that force opposition as well as the small razor sharp crimps are common and found in many of the area classics and test pieces such as Stickman, Proper Modulation, The Nick and Tsunami. Further adding to the experience is the mental game of unlocking beta. Large, seemingly good features from the ground, climb very different than they appear and makes for some thought provoking beta decryption. The high-quality rock, its texture and features along with the vision of the locals has produced a movement and style unique to the Southeast. 

Chris on Tsunami V8

Chris on Tsunami V8

Located inside Hanging Rock State Park in North Carolina, Moore’s Wall is one of many state parks maintained by the North Carolina Parks division. It is part of the Sauratown Mountain Range (1,700 feet to more than 2,500 feet in elevation). It is comprised of four primary sectors, The Main Area, The Valley, The North End, and Two Mile. One of the great things about Moore’s is that the sun exposure is different for each of the areas. During some of the coldest months you can still climb at Two Mile since it is south facing and will always be warmer than the other areas. On the flip side, if it is warm out you can climb at The North End, which is always ten or more degrees colder than The Main Area or Valley. However, a cooler temperature if it is humid out (and this is North Carolina) will just mean the boulder will feel wet. We don’t make the rules here.

Kitten Mittons V7

Kitten Mittons V7

As you might expect, the best time of year to climb here is when it is cold and dry. Although you can theoretically “climb” year round, the heat, poor friction, smog of bugs, unreasonably large spiders, and rattle snakes during the warmer months are a deterrent for most climbers. The climbing season can start as early as September if the temperatures stop exceeding 80 and 90 degrees and continues until it gets unbearably cold at the dead of winter. Climbing picks back up in February or March and continues through May/June. Although with global warming you can occasionally climb throughout the so-called cold months. In what roughly correlates, in our calendar, to the month of December, there is a yearly sasquatch migration. They can be quite territorial. When confronted, avoid direct eye contact; it may be considered an invitation or a challenge depending on the gender of the sasquatch. Be especially careful on a lunar leap year.

 
 
 
 
 
 

Learn more about Adam Sokolow here.

Yangshuo China Rock Climbing by Andrew Hedesh

Buy Yangshuo Rock here and save money versus purchasing from within our app via Apple or Google. It’s exactly the same guidebook, but offered at a lower price on rakkup.com.

Drone footage of the Painted Corridor, Photo: Rock Abond

Drone footage of the Painted Corridor, Photo: Rock Abond

If you’ve ever wondered what China or other parts of the Far East look like, now’s your chance. Yangshuo is one of the most unbelievably hip places on this planet. It’s a microcosm of everything you ever wanted in life. You know how there are those tiny locations nestled into the threadwork of each countries daily life labeled an ‘escape’, well Yangshuo is one of them. Life is pleasant here. Everyone walks around with a smile and are content with life. It’s a place removed from big city drama, allows cultures to cross, and welcomes every idea under the sun.

Traditional cormorant fishing culture, Photo: Anotherdayattheoffice.com

Traditional cormorant fishing culture, Photo: Anotherdayattheoffice.com

For starters, Yangshuo is located amidst the most amazing and fantastic scenery you will ever lay eyes upon. Plentiful 200m tall green towers rise abruptly in every direction starting immediately outside your hotel balcony continuing past your wildest fantasies. And when there aren’t any towers, you’ll find farmer villages surrounded by lush rice paddies and crazy amounts of interconnected trails with swimming holes and hidden caves. The best way to enjoy it all is by grabbing a bicycle and heading out to discover a surreal world where ancient lifestyles mingle with contemporary pursuits.

Overlooking Yangshuo Town, Photo: David Kaszlikowski

Overlooking Yangshuo Town, Photo: David Kaszlikowski

Heading back into town, you might be turned-off by the blistering pace of China’s population and their go-get-it attitude, but then you’ll realize what’s ahead of you is more interesting than the tranquil nature 5 minutes at your back. The town of Yangshuo offers a different perspective of China’s rich history more than any other tourist destination. As said before, it’s used as an escape from the real world, a weekend holiday get-away. The upbeat metropolitan tourists have forced Yangshuo to host an array of first-world amenities rivaled by few and far between. You’ll be pleasantly surprised by the comfort.

Approach to The Egg, Photo: Ursa Kenk

Approach to The Egg, Photo: Ursa Kenk

So as you can see, Yangshuo is a tale of two towns. One with unrivaled natural beauty and a downhome local scene, ahhhh…the climbing, local people, and landscape are simply amazing. Then the second, an upbeat take-it-as-it-comes metropolitan escapade, with either a romantic calmness or wild eccentric nightlife. Yangshuo is an incredibly rare treasure to find on this planet, and its calling for you to experience it. Bring your smiles, climbing shoes, and adventurous soul, all to let yourself get lost in the splendor of everything that is China.

The only way to discuss rock climbing in Yangshuo is to start with the complete experience. Sure, you can travel here purely for the climbing, but after a few days you’ll realize there is so much more. Yangshuo is stocked full of the most interesting international climbers you will meet anywhere, and when intertwined with such a huge diversity of climbing styles it has evolved into the epitome of a world-class rock climbing destination.

Moon Hill, Photo: Henn Photography

Moon Hill, Photo: Henn Photography

Yangshuo rock is stupendous. The karst topography present in South China offers an experience like no other; areas in Thailand Laos and Vietnam can’t compete with the plethora of rock nor the subtle variations found in the rock of Yangshuo. Each of the 50+ crags are located on different towers resulting in every climbing sector having different atmosphere, scenery, and approaches. Furthermore, none of the crags are similar to each other with regards to sun exposure, weather protection, or rock features. Once you experience it, you’ll easily understand why Yangshuo’s rock caters to everyone’s preferred climbing style…even limestone cracks!

Moon Hill, Photo: Henn Photography

Moon Hill, Photo: Henn Photography

As mentioned, there is something for everyone. Routes range in difficulty from 5.5/4 to 5.14d/9a with plenty of high-end Open Projects. There is steep pumpy terrain, technical edgy face climbs, and 3D body torqueing routes. You can pull on tufas until your heart’s content or tip-toe crimp your way to heaven. Everything is possible in Yangshuo including, multi-pitches, deep-water soloing, traditional routes, and limitless development potential. These are the main reasons why Yangshuo has been repeatedly featured in climbing films as well as magazines and continues to attract professional climbers from around the globe.

Yangshuo is one of the best climbing locations in the world. Yes, the rock diversity plays a major role in this designation, but when mixed with friendly welcoming people, a plethora of opposite sex eye-candy, comfortable and familiar living amenities, and easy access to international travel hubs, it’s difficult to find another location with such appeal. After you’ve been here for a while, you may never want to leave. The amount of psych emanating from your crag mates is unrivaled anywhere. You’ll push past individual mental limitations and find undiscovered motivation to attain your next high-point. Give Yangshuo the chance to show you what is possible in this world. It could be the next place you call home!

 
 

Learn more about Andrew Hedesh here.